Pseudo-scientific validation - [Le site d'Irna]
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Pseudo-scientific validation
Article published on 2 May 2007

by Irna

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Ever since the excavations in the valley of Visoko began, the Osmanagic Foundation has frequently promised "international scientific validation" of the project and the "evidence" that would confirm the Bosnian ‘pyramids’ hypothesis. If, during 2006, a few Egyptian or Italian scientists apparently supported the project to some degree, none of these scientists (Dr Barakat, Dr Ibrahim Aly, Dr Dario Andretta...) has ever published a report, or even the most fleeting written opinion [1], of their visit to Visoko, and the sole document published as "international validation" by the Foundation is this marvellous propaganda poster:

Vérification internationale
International validation - Source

In 2007, it appears that the Osmanagic Foundation is continuing to invite foreign scientists to Visoko to study the ‘pyramids’ - but ‘scientists’ of a very different kind from the previous ones, who had been bona fide geologists or archaeologists. For instance, a news item dated 30th of April (bs) on the Foundation website mentions the visit of "Dr. Harry Oldfield from Great Britain and Dr. Karin Tag from Germany".

Let’s begin with "Dr. Karin Tag". The Foundation provides only her name, but she is described by the local media (bs) and pro-pyramid forums as an "archaeologist and geologist". No point in looking for any academic references or publications; you won’t find them. Karin Tag is, nevertheless, a medium, a member (and maybe even founder - she owns the domain name, at least) of the "Seraphim Institute" (de). The purpose of this Institute, located in Germany, is that of establishing world peace by means of meditation, prayer and "energy transfers" using a "crystal skull", of which Karin Tag is also the guardian. Karin Tag takes this crystal skull, known as the "Corazón de Luz" (Heart of Light) - we are told that it has links with Atlantis - all over the world to "places of magic" that she uses the skull to "activate." Besides the classic examples of the temple of Karnak and Great Pyramid of Kufu, these places of magic also include Notre Dame, the Eiffel Tower and Euro-Disney... Can we neglect the possibility of the skull making a brief trip recently to one of the Bosnian ‘pyramids’? [2]

Let’s now consider the Englishman, "Dr. Harry Oldfield". The Foundation web site describes him (bs) as a "biologist, Honorary Doctor of Sciences, visiting professor at Grenada Unversity’s School of Medicine, and member of the Royal Society of Microscopic Research in Oxford". These last two titles are actually mentioned in the brochure on Dr Oldfield’s web site ("Fellow of the Royal Microscopical Society, Oxford, and Visiting Professor, Department of Medicine, Grenada University"); however, it should be noted that there is no mention of a ‘Harry Oldfield’ on the Royal Microscopical Society website (although there does happen to be a Dr Oldfield there, he is known as ‘Ron’ or ‘Ronald’) [3], nor on the St. George University website in Grenada. What really brings a smile to one’s face is the fact that the Foundation website description ‘forgot’ to provide the precise details of Oldfield’s other titles, perhaps because they do not have the required ‘serious’ or scientific cachet. According to his own brochure, Oldfield is in fact a "homeopathic physician" who, in 2000, received an "Honorary Doctorate from the World Peace Centre in Pune, India", and a "Professor Honoris Causa in the Department of Alternative Medicine, Zoroastrian College, Mumbai, India". These two institutions, though respectable enough, are oriented more toward spiritual development than science, and it is perhaps going slightly too far to describe Oldfield as a ‘Doctor of Science’...

As with Karin Tag, there is not much point in looking for mentions of Dr Oldfield’s papers in scientific publications: there are none [4]. Yet Mr. Oldfield is a great inventor: he invented an "electro-crystal therapy" used to "balance the human energy field", stimulating its "chakras and meridians" by means of a combination of "electro-magnetic generator" and crystals; as well as an "electro-scanning process" and an "electro-transplant therapy". His most recent invention is the one he used on the Bosnian ‘pyramids’, the "PIP" or "Polycontrast Interference Photography", which, so he claims, enables him to photograph "interference between photons and the human energy field". That is the most that Dr Oldfield will say about the scientific principles of his invention; if you want to know more, you would have to perhaps consider purchasing "PIP Reality" software, at a cost of £3,392.50 ...

As I have no intention of either buying this software (which seems to be nothing more than glorified image processing software... see here) or of paying for the "training" required to interpret the images, I will refrain from further comment on this extraordinary technology, which, according to this article in the magazine Nexus, allowed Mr. Oldfield to carry out research into ghosts and supernatural entities [5]. The most that can be said is that his software produces nice pictures that are immediately published on the Foundation website (bs), and that, according to Mr. Oldfield, show the presence of "anomalies": these are vertical and "pulsating" energy fields, which Mr. Osmanagic interprets as proof that the ‘pyramids’ are "giant energy accumulators", "generators of electro-magnetic energy" (bs)...

So, given that all we’ve been presented with are doctors of ‘spiritual science’, chakras, crystal skulls, mysterious "photonic electro-magnetic phenomena", secret and earth-shattering technology that has never undergone scientific evaluation, we’re still rather a long way off from supposed "scientific validation"... That said, however, it cannot be denied that there is a certain kind of logic in the ‘pseudo-scientific’ validation of a ‘pseudo-archaeological’ project!